Category Archives: SMB Technology

This blog covers topics on small business technologies.

Position Your Company for Growth in 2021 and Beyond

What a year it’s been! With the pandemic pushing rapid changes in how businesses operate (e.g., more remote workers), a company’s IT infrastructure and applications need to be nimble, responsive and secure in the face of increasing demand for digital transformation. Read on to learn more about trends associated with this shift.

 

How the Pandemic Impacts Your Technology Investment

 

Companies  have been forced to move quickly this year. The ongoing pandemic  has both required a shift to increasing digitalization, and shown the companies that have shifted that it’s possible to be resilient in a crisis. This event has shown the need for agility and responsiveness, and has helped companies refine approaches to doing business digitally. According to an IDC report, 65% of global GDP is expected to become digitized in the next few years, with $6.8 billion of IT spending allocated to the endeavor. The pandemic has not kept digital growth from happening, but rather has accelerated it. Many companies are expected to put in place a mechanism for shifting their infrastructure to the cloud by late next year. Edge computing, wherein the data is processed close to the people who need to use it, is driven by changes that the pandemic has brought, including a growing remote work force. Moving to the Cloud and digitizing operations will give businesses the security, responsiveness and agility they need to remain competitive. 

 

Resilient and Adaptable Technology is  Key to Success

 

Let’s face it, the pandemic has ushered us into a new world. Though there may be growing pains, not all changes are adverse. Companies that have adapted to changes–more remote work, for instance–are in a position to use this flexibility to adjust to an increasingly digital economy. According to the report, IDC predicts that “In 2022, companies focused on digital resiliency will adapt to disruption and extend services to respond to new conditions 50% faster than ones fixated on restoring existing business/IT resiliency levels.” One trend predicted companies will put a mechanism in place to shift to cloud-centric infrastructure and applications twice as fast as before the pandemic.

 

This year and the coming ones have brought, and will continue to bring, great change. Those companies that have adapted stand ready to be resilient in the new year and beyond. To ensure your company is one of them, contact us today.

Trends in Cybersecurity in 2020

This extraordinary year, with its rapid shift toward remote work force, has brought about changes in the cybersecurity landscape. With the security perimeter widened by use of devices outside the office, businesses are using the cloud more than before. According to a recent CompTIA research report on the state of cybersecurity, 60% of respondents were taking a more formal approach to risk management and threat intelligence; however, there’s always room for growth. Read on to learn how 2020 events have changed approaches toward cybersecurity. 

 

Acceleration of Cloud Computing

 

One trend in the report is the acceleration of the use of cloud computing. With so many employees working remotely, companies have, at the very least, sent their employees home to work and hurrying to secure day-to-day operations. With this increased use of cloud computing, keeping an eye on the threat landscape is still vital. Cyber attacks have increased, including “phishing,” and are now considered inevitable. The question is how companies will respond. 

 

Cybersecurity the Responsibility of the Entire Organization

Cybersecurity is no longer merely the responsibility of the IT department. From the newest employee to the board of directors, everyone has a responsibility to help protect data and systems. The executives and board can map out the plan for cybersecurity, beginning with assessing current risks to data and systems. Every employee can be trained in how to handle cyber attacks, and how to prevent them from occurring. Upper management can set the tone, creating a culture of cybersecurity.

 

Formalization of Cybersecurity Practices

 

Along with the increased momentum of cybersecurity adoption, the approach is becoming formalized. According to the CompTIA survey, the majority of companies have taken a more formal approach toward cybersecurity, adopting metrics to measure how well they’re doing. The process starts with risk assessment and management by directors and executives. What security pitfalls might come with remote work? How secure are a company’s data and systems? Formalization of practices also includes measuring and monitoring security efforts that are tied to business objectives. Such metrics might include how many systems have current operating systems, or what percent of employees have been trained in avoiding phishing schemes. 

 

While some aspects of cybersecurity (like an ever-evolving threat landscape) are the same, many businesses are changing their approach to cybersecurity. For help in evaluating your company’s approach, contact us today.

Become Aware, Get Prepared. October is National Cybersecurity Awareness Month

October brings to mind cool days and crisp leaves. Another hallmark of this month is cybersecurity awareness. Government and industry have collaborated to “raise awareness about the importance of cybersecurity and to ensure all businesses have the resources to be safer and more secure online.” Read on to learn how to make your business more aware of and proactive in protecting its network, data and systems from cyberattack. 

 

Take Stock of Your Network’s Health

 

Cybersecurity awareness is always vital, not just at a particular time of year. One way to move beyond simple awareness is to take stock of your network’s health. A company’s network is only as strong as its weakest point. Do you have a map of your network, with all devices connected to it? Are there holes in your operating system where cyber criminals can get in and steal or compromise data? Do you have the most current operating system patches to prevent this? Also consider whether antivirus and antimalware definitions are current or if they need to be updated. Is your network being monitored? Remote monitoring helps you stay aware of the health of your network, and can solve small problems before they become big issues. 

 

Keeping an Eye on Cyber Threats

 

Another aspect of cybersecurity awareness is knowing the threats to your network. From ransomware to phishing schemes, cyber criminals are keeping pace with the growth of technology, especially during these unusual times. Do your workers know what a phishing email looks like, and do they know what to do and not to do if they get one? Your workers can be a good source of information when trained to recognize attacks. In addition, password management is another way to keep your system safe. Having unique passwords that are changed on a regular basis can help to keep attackers out of your network.

 

Let this month of cybersecurity awareness be a wake-up call to your business, and spur you to be as well protected as possible. For assistance in developing a plan or strengthening your network’s security, contact us today. 

Plan Now to Protect Yourself from Cyber Threats

Imagine an external cyber attack occurring in your business, or an employee getting exploited by a phishing email. Will you know what you’ll do in the event of a data breach, and are you prepared to act immediately? Read on to learn more about how planning your response to a cyber attack can help you respond quickly and calmly.

 

What to Consider When Developing Your Cybersecurity Plan

 

Your business may have a plan in place already to cope with the latest cyber threats–ideally, this is the case. Or else, you have a plan that needs to be revisited and updated, reflecting the changed work environment brought about by remote workers caused by the pandemic. This is a good time to take an inventory of your IT assets and network security. Starting with the basics, look to see if there are any vulnerabilities that need to be patched with the most up-to-date operating systems patches. Are your antivirus and anti-malware definitions current? Also, can you account for all devices connected to your network, such as laptops used by remote workers? Going beyond the basics your  plan should include training your employees to remain safe while remote by knowing how to identify phishing schemes that could result in a ransomware attack. Additionally, evaluate advanced security risks related to compliance requirements, sensitive data or high cost of unplanned downtime. 

 

Planning Now Helps You Respond Quickly Later

 

You’ve probably heard the saying, “Plan your work and work your plan.” This definitely applies to your plan for keeping your network secure. What if your company experiences a cyber attack that leads to a data breach? You’ll need to know the deadlines for notifying customers and other parties of a data breach, as well as any data protection regulations to follow. If a remote worker experiences an attack, they’ll need to know what to do immediately. Ideally, they will know best practices and follow your incident response policy. Having your network security plan ready means you can act immediately to remediate damage to your network and your business.

 

Planning your response before an attack will position you to act quickly and calmly to an attack. For help in developing or refining your network security plan, contact us today. 

Unified Communications Can Help You Stay Connected

In our current situation, the ability to work anywhere is even more important. Whether at the office, on the go–or quite commonly these days, at home–unified communications (UC) supports the ability to communicate by voice or email and send information back and forth. Read on to learn more about how this technology can help your business always be available.

According to a recent Gartner report, Unified Communications is expected to grow by $167.1 billion over the next five years, an average of 16.8% per year. This technology brings together various modes of communication–phone, text, web conferencing and email, providing a streamlined way to keep businesses connected. Employees working at home can collaborate via web conferencing, send data via email, and communicate with customers by phone. Voice Over IP (VoIP) supports this technology by providing phone connections via the Internet. Companies no longer have to rely solely on analog or private branch exchange (PBX) systems. Chat and email with customers and other employees is made easier. Applications like CRM can be integrated to expedite service, too.

The Need for Software-Defined Wide Area Networks (SD-WAN)

Unified Communications technology, enabled by the cloud, needs a fast and reliable network. Software-defined wide area networks (SD-WAN) uses multiple carrier service providers to furnish a wide area network with failover; if one part of the network experiences a bottleneck, another can pick up the traffic. Not only does SD-WAN provide a highly available network, but it can also save costs over legacy MPLS with added flexibility and a variety of carriers. Unified Communications can test the limits of your company’s  network.  With SD-WAN, your company’s wide area networks will always be available, from anywhere.

Considerations for Adopting Unified Communications

As always, unified communications depend on a reliable network. Consider evaluating your network for its bandwidth and security, making sure it can handle additional traffic and no vulnerabilities to cyber attack. Your company’s antivirus and antimalware definitions and firewall should be up to date, too. Also, check to ensure only authorized users are able to access your network.

Unified Communications and its supporting technologies can be instrumental to helping your staff work anywhere. To determine your company’s readiness, contact us today. 

Migrating to the Cloud to Access Line of Business Applications

Our unusual times have pushed businesses into adoption of cloud computing, the main reason being the increased demand for remote work along with the ability to maintain business operations. Gartner’s prediction for increase in cloud revenue in 2020 was 17%, from $227.8 billion to $266.4 billion, even before COVID 19. It’s possible that that revenue may increase even more. The “why” of moving to the cloud is easier to define for some than the “how.” Read on to learn more about the benefits of moving your line-of-business applications to the cloud. 

 

Benefits of Cloud Computing for Business Applications

 

The question on the minds of many business owners is how to migrate critical business applications to the cloud. Some applications are cloud-ready (for fast migration) or cloud-optimized, running on Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) or Platform as a Service (PaaS) delivery models. As with all options, these have their benefits and considerations. Another option is cloud-native or SaaS applications, wherein computing resources are available via the Internet. The cloud service provider provides the infrastructure, too, so there is no need for costly capital expenses. Instead, SaaS provides an economical, subscription-based delivery model for cloud services, services which provide a wide range of mission-critical applications–CRM, accounting, HR, email and more. These can be accessed both in office and–very important, now–away from the office for remote workers. Another benefit of SaaS is that customer-facing applications (online chat, for example) can be rapidly deployed. 

 

Considerations for Cloud Migration

 

As ever, a business needs to consider its business needs before cloud migration. What are the mission-critical applications that need to be available at all times? Where does the cloud data center reside, and what provisions are there for redundancy or fail-over? Another consideration is the health of a company’s network, whether it has any weak points that need patching, or any antivirus or anti-malware definitions needing to be updated. Yet another is bandwidth; is there enough to support the heavy Internet use? 

 

If you know you want or need to move your primary line-of-business applications to a cloud environment, and need guidance, contact us today for an assessment of your cloud readiness. 

Developing A Plan for Data Protection

Data breaches have become so common that they are no longer news. Gartner predicts,  “as more companies look to benefit from data, there will be an inevitable increase in data use and sharing missteps.” However, organizations that have a culture of ethics for data use will be better prepared to avoid such mistakes, and to handle them well if they do occur. Read on to learn how your company can have not just a data protection plan, but a culture that revolves around protecting the personal data of your customers. 

 

Protecting Your Business and Your Customer’s Data

 

In spite of the occurrence of data breaches, your company can be protected. If you haven’t already done so, you might draw up a data-protection plan that will address what to do in case of a breach. Ideally your organization will already have technology in place to prevent data breaches–tools such as updated antivirus and anti-malware definitions and network monitoring, for instance. Hopefully, there is also a culture of ethics around use of customer information, including transparency with customers about what is done to protect their personal data. 

 

Countries and entire regions, such as Australia and Europe, have put legislation into effect to protect customers. Europe’s GDPR mandates a notification within 72 hours of a data breach. Australia’s Consumer Data Right gives its citizens the right to delete information that is no longer needed, as well as stopping data collection at any time While the U.S. has no nationwide law, individual states have their own regulations. For example, California gives their residents certain rights under the California Consumer Privacy Act, such as the right to opt out of having their data sold.  The CCPA also sets forth steep monetary penalties for failing to protect customer information. Businesses are required, among other things, to have a conspicuous link for customers to click in order to opt out of having their personal information used. Regulations may vary, but their intent–the protection of data–is similar. 

 

Using Legislation as a Data Protection Template

 

Even in areas without this legislation yet in place, businesses can develop a robust plan based on such standards. Topics to address in this plan can include what your company will do in the event of a data breach, and whether data will be shared with third-party vendors. One task for companies is to inventory their vendors; smaller vendors might not have rigorous rules for handling data. 

 

To protect your company from the consequences of a data breach is vital. To develop a plan for protecting your customers’ data, or to fine-tune one you already have, contact us today. 

Get Your Business Ready for the Cloud with a Strong Strategy

While many businesses have already adopted cloud computing to a certain extent, others are still new to the technology. Whether your business is using cloud computing already, or is considering a move, it’s never too soon to develop a strong strategy. Read on to learn more about developing a strategy to guide your business in considering cloud computing.

Strategy, Then Implementation

A key feature of a cloud strategy is that it addresses why a company might move some or all of its operations to the cloud. According to a report by Gartner, “a cloud strategy explores and defines the role that cloud computing should play in an organization.” Formulating a strategy is a task of the entire organization, not simply the IT department. Departments such as human resources, legal and finance can provide valuable input, since they will use the computing resources that the cloud can provide.

A company that has already moved some of its data and applications to the cloud can also develop a strategy moving forward. It’s easy to assume that if a business has moved to the cloud, it’s too late to develop a strategy. Quite the contrary, a strategy can help refine a company’s motivation for adopting cloud technology, based on lessons already learned. Strategists can examine how the cloud has benefited the business so far, meeting its needs (conforming to data regulations, for instance). Along with accomplishments, it gives a business  the opportunity to correct any mistakes going forward. Once a strategy has been formulated, then implementation (including choosing a provider and a cloud environment) can begin.

Contingency Plans as Part of Your Cloud Strategy

It may seem odd to consider an exit strategy at the starting point, but developing an exit strategy makes sense. An exit strategy outlines contingency plans, what to do in case of the unexpected. For instance, what if something happens to the data center that your cloud service provider uses, or if you need or want to change providers. An exit strategy entails more than simply ending a service level agreement (SLA); it also affects what happens with your data. Is it portable, as well as secure? Another option is scaling back, instead of exiting entirely. These are issues to consider in developing a strategy.

Before implementing cloud computing, and choosing a provider or cloud environment, consider the overall needs and goals of your business. For assistance in developing a strategy, contact us today.

Network Monitoring for Your Business

Your organization’s computer network is the backbone of your IT operations, supporting data and applications such as Voice-Over IP (VoIP), call center and more. Monitoring this network can help save time and money. Read on to learn more about the benefits of network monitoring, and what to consider before adopting a solution.

Benefits of Network Monitoring

Network monitoring is a proactive way to detect and mitigate threats to your network’s security. One key function of network monitoring is identifying and solving small problems before they become larger issues. Network monitoring can identify possible intrusions from virus and malware, stopping data breaches before they occur and saving your business money and reputation. Network monitoring also helps identify any bottlenecks and reroutes traffic to keep data flowing, allowing your system to adapt in real time and data-intensive applications like VoIP and call centers to operate at their best. 

Why Monitor Your Network? 

Before adopting a network monitoring solution, consider the most critical needs of your network. One factor is your IT budget; how much should you allocate to avoid unnecessary downtime and performance issues?  Loss of productivity, inability to service or communicate with customers and other business interruption can add up. Another factor to consider is how you will respond to remediate any notifications and alerts.  With businesses partially closed because of COVID-19, remote network monitoring might be the best option. Remote monitoring constantly looks for potential bottlenecks and intrusions, removing the need for an on-site visit. Remote monitoring and management provides additional operating system patches and ensures anti-virus and anti-malware definitions are current to block possible data breaches. Again, this can help protect the network of health-care organizations, for whom security of data is paramount. 

With your network a vital part of IT infrastructure, network monitoring is vital to keep it working smoothly and keeping your data secure. For more guidance in choosing a network monitoring solution, contact us today. 

What is Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS)?

Cloud computing is now a common way for small to medium-size businesses to provision computing resources for flexible, cost-effective results. Read on to learn about how one cloud model–Infrastructure as a Service or IaaS–can help your business manage spend and maximize results. 

IaaS Provides Flexibility

According to Gartner, Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) is a standardized, highly automated offering, wherein computing resources, complemented by storage and networking capabilities are owned by a service provider and offered to the customer on demand. With the infrastructure owned and managed by the cloud service provider, the business using the resources no longer needs to maintain infrastructure on-premises. The business can let the provider do the work of maintenance and updating, which converts a capital expense to an operating expense paid on a monthly or annual basis. In an IaaS model, a company can purchase extra resources for experimental technical initiatives, then scale back when needed. On-site infrastructure is available, to which new applications can be added.

What to Consider Before Adopting IaaS

Infrastructure as a Service, with its many benefits, still needs to be evaluated according to business needs. Some companies such as health care organizations are subject to compliance with HIPAA and HITrust, and will need a private cloud environment. Encryption of health-care data is vital, when it is in motion (as in the case of a telehealth appointment) or at rest. IaaS offers the most control for health-care organizations, including the ability for IT admins to modify how data is handled and stored. While some organizations might need to spend more for this level of security, maintaining security and compliance is worth the extra spend. Organizations need to examine their budget to make sure they can handle the expenditure for trained staff as well as increased data storage. 

Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) provides the benefits of cloud computing while eliminating the need for control and management of on-site infrastructure, in many cases. To evaluate your business’ readiness for IaaS, contact us today.